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MASTERS OF LAVA ROCK:
OUR ARTISAN PARTNERS FROM PUEBLA

Ayres VASIJA DUNA

"We believe artisans are a fundamental part not only of our company but of our country." - AYRES

That country is Mexico – a country with many roots. The ancestries in Mexico are profound and meaningful and rich. And from these deep roots come many artisans. Like our master carvers, who work with the plentiful lava rock that forms the base for the centre of the country.

SAN SALVADOR EL SECO, Puebla Arial

MATERIAL ORIGIN: SAN SALVADOR EL SECO, Puebla

San Salvador, Puebla is a small town of under 20,000 residents, located 75km almost due east of the state capital of Puebla. Nestled in the shadow of active volcanoes in the Sierra Madre, it’s no surprise that items made of lava rock provide a starting point for the artisans in this region. Volcanic material began covering this land in layer after layer, millions of years ago. If anything is sustainable in the state of Puebla, it’s Lava rock. 

Arched Doorway in SAN SALVADOR EL SECO, Puebla
Farmer in SAN SALVADOR EL SECO, Puebla

WHAT IS LAVA ROCK?

The “Piedra Volcánica” is what you get when lava cools and solidifies. Hundreds of years ago, the locals began forming tools from this material to grind corn and nuts. When heated, lava rock sheds non-toxic minerals that give foods cooked in molcajetes a distinct flavour. You cannot replicate this flavour unless you cook with Lava rock, and you will find at least one molcajete in the kitchen of every great chef around the world. As well as every single kitchen in Mexico. In addition, lava rock has high mass and food stays hot much, much longer.

Ayres Lava Rock

Volcano trivia: Mexico’s tallest active volcano Popocatépetl — “Popo” is a lot easier to remember — is in the state of Puebla and sits at just under 18,000 feet above sea level. The volcano featured prominently in Malcolm Lowry’s 1947 novel Under the Volcano as well as John Huston’s film adaptation of the same name.

Ayres Lava Rock in Hand
Ayres Artisan Tools

OUR ARTISAN PARTNERS

The process begins with the search for the stone in the mountains (not all lava rock is suitable). The rock is hand-carved, which is a very long process and larger pieces can take up to a day to fully carve.  

Aryes Artisan Portrait

Our Mexican artisan partners tell us that they love working with lava rock – as their forefathers (and mothers) did. The textures, the colours, and the ancestral powers inspire them. 

Ayres Artisan Crafting
Large Lava Rock

SHOP THE AYRES COLLECTION

Volcanic Stone Xolo Salt Dish | Obakki
Volcanic Stone Xolo Salt Dish | Obakki
 Xolo Salt Dish | Obakki
 Xolo Salt Dish | Obakki
 Xolo Salt Dish | Obakki
 Xolo Salt Dish | Obakki

Xolo Salt Dish

$95.00
White Marble Duna Vase | White | Obakki
White Marble Duna Vase | White | Obakki
 Duna Vase | White | Obakki
White Marble Duna Vase | White | Obakki
 Duna Vase | White | Obakki
 Duna Vase | White | Obakki
 Duna Vase | White | Obakki
 Duna Vase | White | Obakki

Duna Vase | White

$285.00
Volcanic Stone Mayapán Bowl | Obakki
Volcanic Stone Mayapán Bowl | Obakki
 Mayapán Bowl | Obakki
 Mayapán Bowl | Obakki
 Mayapán Bowl | Obakki
 Mayapán Bowl | Obakki
 Mayapán Bowl | Obakki

Mayapán Bowl

$725.00
Volcanic Stone Teya Double Bowl | Obakki
Volcanic Stone Teya Double Bowl | Obakki
 Teya Double Bowl | Obakki
 Teya Double Bowl | Obakki
 Teya Double Bowl | Obakki
 Teya Double Bowl | Obakki

Teya Double Bowl

$105.00

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